Coronavirus Health

Love in the time of “Corona” … How has the pandemic changed the aspects of the celebration of “Valentine”?

For 13 years, the ancient New York Times Square used to hold an annual art competition celebrating love for Valentine’s Day, or Valentine’s Day. Previously, tourists would watch the winning artwork on their way to a Broadway show, or while gazing at billboards on the street or visiting M & M’s.

But the situation is different this year, as the number of tourists witnessed a significant decline in February of this year, and the crowds that used to crowd on their way to “Times Square”, no longer preferred it in light of the outbreak of the Corona pandemic.

The winning artwork this year was called “Love Letters,” a monument made of thin wood in the form of two intertwining hearts, which began showing on February 10th. The monument was designed with multiple spaces, allowing visitors to interact with each other while maintaining a safe distance. The work also sheds light on topics broader than love, such as solidarity, collective resilience, and reunification. It also allows visitors to view their love messages, and if they are unable to come, they can send their messages electronically.

A challenging year
“We wanted to expand the idea of ​​love beyond just romantic love,” said Jane Cooney, art program director at Times Square, noting that the program collaborated with design and architecture firm Redmaed to prepare for the competition, adding: “It was a full year.” Challenges on several levels, so we wanted to expand the idea of ​​love to include synergy. “

These new themes represent a broader trend that began to appear in many American cities on this year’s Valentine’s Day. Cities and institutions struggling after a year of losses and isolation as a result of the pandemic decided to celebrate Valentine’s Day in a new way, just as they did in other areas that were forced to make adjustments to them, from the sidewalks of roads to the interior designs of offices. All this has resulted in a new focus on the love that goes beyond romantic passion, including platonic love and love for the places we consider our home and the societies in which we inhabit.

Love in a broader perspective this year
Also this year, Portland, Maine, in the United States, seeks to continue its ancient history in celebrating Valentine’s Day. In this city, the tradition of “the ghost of Valentines” originated decades ago, with unknown people spreading decorations in the shape of hearts throughout the city.

To celebrate Valentine’s Day, the downtown area began receiving messages of love addressed to the city and its independent businesses.

Carrie Tyson, executive director of the Portland Downtown Development District, said: “It is a movement that aims to remind you that you love your human brother and love your neighbor and where you are.”

Some believe that these efforts play an effective role in overcoming the barriers imposed by the pandemic, such as wearing masks and social distancing, all of which hinder communication in public places. The pandemic has made interaction between strangers a risky matter and forced them to move away or reconsider their relationship with places that In the past, it was essential to maintaining a social life, from restaurants, cafes, and even houses of worship.

A challenging year
“We wanted to expand the idea of ​​love beyond just romantic love,” said Jane Cooney, art program director at Times Square, noting that the program collaborated with design and architecture firm Redmaed to prepare for the competition, adding: “It was a full year.” Challenges on several levels, so we wanted to expand the idea of ​​love to include synergy. “

Love in a broader perspective this year
Also this year, Portland, Maine, in the United States, seeks to continue its ancient history in celebrating Valentine’s Day. In this city, the tradition of “the ghost of Valentines” originated decades ago, with unknown people spreading decorations in the shape of hearts throughout the city.

To celebrate Valentine’s Day, the downtown area began receiving messages of love addressed to the city and its independent businesses.

Carrie Tyson, executive director of the Portland Downtown Development District, said: “It is a movement that aims to remind you that you love your human brother and love your neighbor and where you are.”

Some believe that these efforts play an effective role in overcoming the barriers imposed by the pandemic, such as wearing masks and social distancing, all of which hinder communication in public places. The pandemic has made interaction between strangers a risky matter and forced them to move away or reconsider their relationship with places that In the past, it was essential to maintaining a social life, from restaurants, cafes, and even houses of worship.

New stamp to celebrate
Valentines Day is also taking on a new character this year for the same lovers who are always keen to celebrate it. Jane Kim and BJ Kim had married in Times Square on Valentine’s Day in 2014, and they return every year to renew their vows while their three daughters accompany them. They even named their youngest daughter “Valentine” after their favorite holiday.

The couple says their wedding day was especially special because it was taking place in the hustle and bustle of the city, while strangers passed by. For them, the pandemic reminds them that strangers are just as important as close people. “It helps you appreciate all kinds of relationships,” Jain added.

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